Standard Schnauzer vs Miniature Schnauzer: Breed Comparison Jun 24, �� Miniature Schnauzer. The Miniature Schnauzer is a smart, trainable, and cheerful little dog that strongly resembles his Standard Schnauzer cousin. Yorkshire Terriers do not shed, and their. The Miniature Schnauzer has a double coat�a wiry topcoat, with a soft undercoat�that requires frequent brushing, combing, and grooming to look its best. The breed sheds very little. For the. A Miniature Schnauzer may not be right for you. Keep in mind that the inheritance of temperament is less predictable than the inheritance of physical traits such as size or shedding. Temperament and behavior are also shaped by raising and training. You can avoid some negative traits by choosing an ADULT dog from an animal shelter or rescue group.

Standard schnauzers have a coat similar to miniature schnauzers. They shed minimally and require the same maintenance and grooming as the minis. Giant schnauzers have the same type of coat as the minis and standards. However, simply because they are larger, giant schnauzers have more noticeable shedding of their undercoat than miniature and standard schnauzers.

You won't see as much fallen hair as you would with heavy shedding breeds like shepherds and collies, but you will see some hair coming out. If you find that one of the schnauzer breeds seem like a good fit for your home and lifestyle, but you have allergies, be sure to spend some time around the breed before bringing one home. Jodi L. Hartley has been a writer and public relations professional since Hartley holds a bachelor's degree in journalism and an M.

Dog Breeds. By Jodi L. Which Type of Schnauzer? Miniature Schnauzer The miniature schnauzer has a double coat. Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.

Treats can help the bonding process go more smoothly. Try giving your dog Glyde Mobility Chews to help them see you as a provider and to keep their joints healthy! See Dogs Less Affectionate with Family. You may be surprised by who's on that list: Fierce-looking Boxers are considered good with children, as are American Staffordshire Terriers which are considered Pit Bulls.

Small, delicate, and potentially snappy dogs such as Chihuahuas aren't always so family-friendly. Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual dog will behave. Dogs from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences, training on how to get along with kids , and personality. No matter what the breed or breed type, all dogs have strong jaws, sharp pointy teeth, and may bite in stressful circumstances.

Young children and dogs of any breed should always be supervised by an adult and never left alone together, period. Friendliness toward dogs and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things.

Some dogs may attack or try to dominate other dogs, even if they're love-bugs with people; others would rather play than fight; and some will turn tail and run. Breed isn't the only factor.

Dogs who lived with their littermates and mother until at least six to eight weeks of age and who spent lots of time playing with other dogs during puppyhood, are more likely to have good canine social skills. Stranger-friendly dogs will greet guests with wagging tails and nuzzles; others are shy, indifferent, or even aggressive.

However, no matter what the breed, a dog who was socialized and exposed to lots of different types, ages, sizes, and shapes of people as a puppy will respond better to strangers as an adult. Remember that even friendly dogs should stay on a good, strong leash like this one in public! If you're going to share your home with a dog, you'll need to deal with some level of dog hair on your clothes and in your house.

However, shedding does vary greatly among the breeds. Some dogs shed year-round, some "blow" seasonally, some do both, and some shed hardly at all. If you're a neatnik, you'll need to either Arts Mini Storage Sheds Carleton Place Shop pick a low-shedding breed or relax your standards.

To help keep your home a little cleaner, you can find a great de-shedding tool here! Drool-prone dogs may drape ropes of slobber on your arm and leave big, wet spots on your clothes when they come over to say hello. If you've got a laid-back attitude toward slobber, fine; but if you're a neatnik, you may want to choose a dog who rates low in the drool department.

Some breeds are brush-and-go dogs; others require regular bathing, clipping, and other grooming just to stay clean and healthy. Consider whether you have the time and patience for a dog who needs a lot of grooming, or the money to pay someone else to do it. Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems, such as hip dysplasia.

This doesn't mean that every dog of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk. If you're adopting a puppy, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in. You may also want to ask if your shelter or rescue has information about the physical health of your potential pup's parents and other relatives.

Many health problems are related to digestion and issues in the gut. Adding Bernie's Perfect Poop digestion support treats to your dog's routine can help your pet feel better and improve their overall health! Some breeds have hearty appetites and tend to put on weight easily.

As in humans, being overweight can cause health problems in dogs. If you pick a breed that's prone to packing on pounds, you'll need to limit treats, make sure they get enough exercise, and measure out their daily food servings into regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time.

Ask your vet about your dog's diet and what they recommend for feeding your pooch to keep them at a healthy weight. If your dog has tummy troubles, adding Bernie's Perfect Poop digestion support treats to their diet can help your dog feel better and improve their overall health! Dogs come in all sizes, from the world's smallest pooch, the Chihuahua, to the towering Great Dane, how much space a dog takes up is a key factor in deciding if they're compatible with you and your living space.

Large dog breeds might seem overpowering and intimidating, but some of them are incredibly sweet! Take a look and find the right sized dog for you!

Many larger dogs are prone to joint issues. Easy-to-train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt such as the word "sit" , an action sitting , and a consequence getting a treat very quickly. Other dogs need more time, patience, and repetition during training. Many breeds are intelligent but approach training with a "What's in it for me? Here are some great treats that can actually improve your dog's digestion to get you started!

Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies. If they don't get the mental stimulation they need, they'll make their own work--usually with projects you won't like, such as digging and chewing. Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue.

Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in Retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats. Dogs who were bred to hunt, such as Terriers, have an inborn desire to chase--and Tts Mini Shed Notation sometimes kill--other animals. Anything whizzing by, such as cats, squirrels, and perhaps even cars, can trigger that instinct. Dogs who like to chase need to be leashed or kept in a fenced area when outdoors, and you'll need a high, secure fence in your yard.

These breeds generally aren't a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Breeds that were originally used for bird hunting, on the other hand, generally won't chase, but you'll probably have a hard time getting their attention when there are birds flying by.

Some breeds sound off more often than others. When choosing a breed, think about how often the dog vocalizes with barks or howls. If you're considering a hound, would you find their trademark howls musical or maddening? If you're considering a watchdog, will a city full of suspicious "strangers" put your pup on permanent alert?

Will the local wildlife literally drive your dog wild? Do you live in housing with noise restrictions? Do you have neighbors nearby? Then you may wish to choose a quieter dog. Some breeds are more free-spirited than others. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest.

And many hounds simply must follow their noses--or that bunny that just ran across the path--even if it means leaving you behind. High-energy dogs are always ready and waiting for action. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they're more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells.

Low-energy dogs are the canine equivalent of a couch potato, content to doze the day away. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying.

Your dog's energy level can also be affected by health issues. Adding Bernie's Perfect Poop digestion support treats to your pet's diet can help them feel better and improve their overall health!

A vigorous dog may or may not have high energy, but everything they do, they do with vigor: they strain on the leash until you train them not to , try to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps.

These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who's elderly or frail. A low-vigor dog, on the other hand, has a more subdued approach to life. Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block.

Others need daily, vigorous exercise, especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, like herding or hunting. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog Keter Compact Mini Garden Shed In sport, such as agility.

Even older dogs need exercise, and it can help fight symptoms of arthritis and other age-related conditions. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your dog's routine can give your dog the joint supplements they need to stay active well into old age. Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate.

Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog.

You may want to consider adopting an older dog. Seniors can remain playful well into old age and have fewer demands than young dogs.

Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your senior's routine can help fight the symptoms of arthritis and keep your old dog active and playful. The Miniature Schnauzer is a small dog with a whole lot of heart.

He's always in the top 20 most popular breeds in the U. He is a "people person" all the way: extroverted with moderately high energy, he just wants to have fun. And being with you is fun, no matter what you do.

He's incredibly loyal to his family � and he requires a great deal of attention. He's got a long beard and bushy eyebrows, and he's a handful. Developed as a ratter, he may look just like a smaller version of the Standard and Giant Schnauzers , but he's a distinct breed of his own. He isn't used much as a ratter any longer although the instinct is still there , but he still has the lively, mischievous personality.

He likes to be in the center of the action. He's fairly good with children and he's energetic, with a lot of terrier spunkiness. The problem is, he has no clue how small he is, and he's likely to talk trash to a much larger dog without any concept of the consequences. That swagger of his can get him in trouble, so it's up to you to keep him in line. Even though he's small, don't mistake your Miniature Schnauzer for a toy breed.

This boy is not delicate. Because of his size, he can be a good city dog, but he needs daily exercise. After all, he's a terrier! He needs to move. A Miniature Schnauzer also enjoys larger quarters and is great with suburban or farm families and there might be some rats out there he can take care of for you. He adapts well to any climate, but he can gain weight quickly if he's not exercised or fed properly.

He's protective of the people he loves and is often suspicious of strangers, until you let him know they're welcome. He's an excellent watchdog, sometimes to your frustration, and will alert you to visitors, burglars, and blowing branches. His bark can be piercing. No Golden Retriever , he won't be licking the burglar in welcome; he'll be making sure you understand the gravity of the situation at full volume.

A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent and learns quickly. Bored during rainy weather? Teach your Schnauzer tricks � he's a great tricks dog. Smart enough to learn anything, he excels at feats that involve jumping on his sturdy little legs. At the same time, he can be stubborn. Really stubborn. Dug-into-the-sand stubborn. His favorite way of rebelling is to pretend that he doesn't hear you "La, la, la, I can't heeear you! To maintain order in your household, you must be in charge. If you let him get by with something even one time, he'll remember it forever and you'll find the behavior escalating.

This is one of the downsides of living with a dog who might possibly be smarter than you are. But because he can be trained so easily one of the upsides of that native intelligence , he tends to do well in obedience and agility competitions. Miniature Schnauzers also participate in earthdog trials and often excel at them.

After all, digging is what they were bred to do. That also means you can expect the occasional decapitated rodent on your doorstep. Unlike a cat's offering, this is not a love gift but spoils going to the warrior who nailed the beast.

Historically, Miniature Schnauzer ears were cropped for cosmetic purposes. Americans are moving away from cropping dogs in general, as more people come to feel it's not worth it for purely cosmetic reasons unlike tail docking, which prevents tail injuries while out in the field.

However, most but not all Miniature Schnauzers who compete in dog shows still have cropped ears. Some breeders won't crop the ears of pet-quality dogs who will never go into the conformation ring.

If you are in contact with the breeder early enough in the process, you can probably make your own decision about cropping your Miniature Schnauzer's ears. Robust in body and mind, the Miniature Schnauzer is a lively, feisty, smart, happy, vocal, affectionate, low-shedding dog. He makes a fine addition to an active family.

Miniature Schnauzers were originally bred to be ratters and guard dogs on farms. They were developed in the mid-to-late 19th century in Germany by crossbreeding the Standard Schnauzer with smaller breeds, such as the Miniature Pinscher , Affenpinscher , and perhaps the Poodle or Pomeranian.

In Germany, he's known as the Zwergschnauzer zwerg means "dwarf". There aren't any records on how the Miniature Schnauzer was developed, but it's clear the intent was to create a smaller version of the well-established Standard Schnauzer. The earliest record of a Miniature Schnauzer was a black female named Findel, born in October In , the first breed club was formed in Cologne, Germany, although it accepted several types of dogs.

World Wars I and II were hard on dog breeding, particularly in Europe, where some breeds were nearly lost. But interest in Miniature Schnauzers boomed after WWI, and the dog's popularity has never waned since. One aspect that has changed since the early days is the preferred colors. You used to be able to find a Schnauzer of almost any size in red, black and tan, yellow, or parti-color � but not today, when shades of black and silver are the rage.

Just as feelings about ear cropping shift with the times, the Miniature Schnauzer's look may change again. Miniature Schnauzers are sturdy and don't look like toy dogs by any stretch of the imagination. They are usually 12 to 14 inches tall at the shoulder. Weight ranges from 11 to 20 pounds. A Miniature Schnauzer is full of life.

An extrovert, he loves to be in the thick of the family action. He may even run up to you while you're sitting down and throw his paws around your neck.

He wants to touch you and be next to you all the time, and you can bet he'll want to sleep plastered to your side. A bit of a spitfire, the Miniature Schnauzer is a terrier � that means he's full of himself.

He's a feisty type A and his work involves amusing himself.




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